Risk in Mesa County

One third of all US homes occur in the wildland urban interface, also known as the WUI (woo-ee.) This is a zone where wild plants and forests meet structures, causing a high risk for wildfires to spread to homes.

In Mesa County wildfire is one of our greatest threats. With many plants that rely on wildfire to thrive including; sage brush, oak brush, pinion/juniper, ponderosa pine, and mixed conifers, this potential cannot be ignored.

Concerns at a glance

While these are not the only concerns that exist in Mesa County, fuels, access to water, terrain, and proximity to homes or natural resources all make them high-risk areas for wildfire. For an in-depth look at risk in the county, check out the Mesa County Wildfire Protection Plan.

 
 
 

Natural Resources

Fire is a natural occurrence throughout the west. Mesa County is home to several ecosystems that rely on wildfire to thrive including: sage brush, oak brush, pinon/juniper, ponderosa pine, and mixed conifer forests. Wildfires in these habitats reduce the build up of fuels, promote plant diversity, and return much needed nutrients back into the soil.

However, wildfires can also have devastating impacts on critical habitats, cottonwood forests, water quality, and valuable community open spaces. Because of this, it is important to manage the land and educate the community to find a balance that gains the benefits, but avoids the devastation of fire.

Part of what people love about Colorado is our public lands, parks, and preserves. These beautiful areas provide essential habitat for plants and animals, and add to the quality of life in Mesa County. 

Water Quality

After wildfires, ash and soot can runoff into rivers and streams negatively impacting water quality, choking rivers of oxygen and harming aquatic wildlife.

River

habitat

 These transition zones between land and river habitats are critical to the larger desert ecosystm. They protect the watershed, but plants may also become overgrown and more vulnerable to fires. 

Kid Rowing

Kid Rowing

Abstract Water

Abstract Water

Aerial Photo of a River

Aerial Photo of a River

Parks and Preserves

 

Community Impacts

Beyond natural resources, the effects of wildfires can be far-reaching. Individuals, neighborhoods, businesses, economies, infrastructure, and utilities can all feel the impacts of a wildfire long after the flames are gone.

IMG_7438

IMG_7438

Utility Pole

Utility Pole

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cooking-hands-handwashing-health-545013.

health concerns

Smoke affects people and animals, especially young children, older adults and those with asthma, heart problems, and health conditions.

Power &

the Grid

Water & Wastewater

Power can be shut off for long periods of time during a fire for safety reasons. This impacts health equipment, food storage, cell phones, and emergency information

Water resources can be compromised by direct contamination or when electricity is down and treatment systems are disrupted.

lighted-beige-house-1396132

lighted-beige-house-1396132

closeup-photo-black-door-yes-we-are-open

closeup-photo-black-door-yes-we-are-open

cooking-hands-handwashing-health-545013.

cooking-hands-handwashing-health-545013.

Homes &

Businesses

Fires don't stop at fences or property lines. The wildland urban interface presents immediate threats to personal property and businesses in the community.

Local

Economy

Community Fabric

Services, tourism, and business operations all feel an immediate impact from wildfires. Recovery is dynamic and long-term with both negative impacts and positive opportunities.

Historical, cultural, and social resources are also at stake in a wildfire. Significant places, organizations, and resources can all be destabilized or at risk from wildfire activities.