kit

kit

plan

plan

alert

alert

If you have to evacuate, do you have what you need? What about your kids? Your pets? Build a kit today.

Make sure your family has an emergency evacuation and reunification plan.

Register your cell phone to receive emergency alerts.

Preparing Your Family

Evacuations are never convenient. Often families only have minutes notice to leave their homes. With the risk of wildfire, make sure you are prepared with supplies, a communication plan, and a cell phone that will get the notices you depend on.

 
 
 

A defensible space around your home offers protection from wildfire getting too near your home. Defensible space also creates a physical space where firefighters can protect your home in the event of a wildfire. Fire crews look for defensible space when making choices about which homes are savable and which are not.

Zone 1 extends 30 feet* out from buildings, structures, decks, etc.

  • Remove all dead plants, grass and weeds (vegetation).

  • Remove dead or dry leaves and pine needles from your yard, roof and rain gutters.

  • Trim trees regularly to keep branches a minimum of 10 feet from other trees.

  • Remove branches that hang over your roof and keep dead branches 10 feet away from your chimney.

  • Relocate wood piles into Zone 2.

  • Remove or prune flammable plants and shrubs near windows.

  • Remove vegetation and items that could catch fire from around and under decks.

  • Create a separation between trees, shrubs and items that could catch fire, such as patio furniture, wood piles, swing sets, etc.

Zone 2 extends 100 feet out from buildings, structures, decks, etc.

  • Cut or mow annual grass down to a maximum height of four inches.

  • Create horizontal spacing between shrubs and trees. (See diagram.)

  • Create vertical spacing between grass, shrubs and trees. (See diagram.)

  • Remove fallen leaves, needles, twigs, bark, cones, and small branches. However, they may be permitted to a depth of three inches.

 

Firewise Landscaping

A fire-resistant landscape isn’t necessarily the same thing as a well-maintained yard. This type of landscape uses fire-resistant plants that are strategically planted to resist the spread of fire to your home. Fire resistant plants are great in California because they are often drought tolerant, too.

 

The good news is, you don’t need a lot of money to make your landscape fire resistant. And you will find that a fire-resistant landscape can increase your property value and conserve water while beautifying your home.

xeriscape

xeriscape

narrow leaf cottonwood

narrow leaf cottonwood

low to ground lants

low to ground lants

backyard-bench-daylight-environment-2105

backyard-bench-daylight-environment-2105

hedging roses

hedging roses

iceplant

iceplant

Create Breaks

Stone walls, paths, and patios create fire-resistant zones around your home.

firewise shrubs

Use Ground cover

Honeysuckle, hedging roses, and sumac have higher water content to resist ignition.

Ice plants, rockrose, and aloe provide fire resistant ground cover and reduce ladder fuels.

spacing matters

Provide space between shrubs and trees to reduce potential for fire to spread.

firewise trees

strategic plant beds

Conifers have high sap content and fire potential. Consider cottonwoods, willows, and aspens.

Use rocks, mulch, and flower beds as ground cover for bare spaces to create fire breaks.

CSU EXTENSION

Local advice on selection and spacing to create your fire-resistant property.

 

Financial Resources

Income tax credit up to $2,500 for mitigation work.

Mitigation grants available to individuals and HOAs.

Mitigation grants available to individuals and HOAs.

Colorado-Logo-New-720x720

Colorado-Logo-New-720x720

csfs

csfs

blm

blm